Hybrid Jobs

Blurring Lines: How Business and Technology Skills Are Merging to Create High Opportunity Hybrid Jobs

Blurring Lines: How Business and Technology Skills Are Merging to Create High Opportunity Hybrid Jobs

With technology driving the everyday lives of most Americans, a new kind of hybrid job blending technology with marketing is gaining in the market. Specifically, these are occupations requiring a combination of programming skills and skills commonly found in design, data analysis, and marketing. In a 12-month period (April 2014-March 2015), more than a quarter million advertised job postings sought hybrid talent in positions such as User Experience Designer, Data Scientist, and Product Manager.

This demand is both a boon and a challenge. These hybrid jobs are a classic example of technology driving job creation, and workers with the needed skills can command salaries comparable to those for positions with more advanced technical requirements. However, at the same time, these positions call for a set of skills that aren’t typically taught as a package. The training ecosystem preparing job seekers for these roles is relatively weak, and these roles do not typically align well with established higher education programs. Computer science programs and traditional vocational IT schools do not usually teach the broad business skill sets these roles require, while design and business schools yield graduates without the necessary technical knowledge. The talent deficit can be seen in the higher salaries in these hybrid fields, as employers compete for the available talent.

Yet this challenge is not as daunting as it could be. The training to prepare for an entry-level hybrid job can often be addressed without the equivalent of a second degree. The technology skills that mix with more traditional business competencies to define these jobs are relatively accessible and easy-to-learn. Accelerated learning programs can often provide the short-term training needed to address entry-level skill needs.

Key findings from the report include:

  • These roles are in high demand: More than 250,000 positions were open in the last year for hybrid jobs.
  • Data analytics, digital marketing and mobile marketing are growing especially fast: Demand for data science skills has tripled over the past five years, while demand for digital marketing and mobile skills has more than doubled.
  • Web development and mobile development positions are in the highest demand: More than 100,000 positions for web and mobile developers have been available over the past year.
  • These jobs pay well: Advertised salaries for these roles range from $65,000 to $111,000 per year. This range is well above the national average starting salary, and in line with IT roles requiring more significant technical training.
  • Mobile development, data analytics, and product management positions pay the highest salaries: These roles each have an average advertised salary of more than $100,000, demonstrating both their high value to employers and the shortage of qualified talent.

C0-authored by Burning Glass and General Assembly.

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